Why We Stopped Exercising

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Exercise special! Debunking common exercise myths about weight loss, movement and exercise.

  • How exercising can negatively affect your health
  • Why you’re not seeing results no matter how hard you workout
  • Healing from the exercise, food binge cycle

Resources…

The podcast has changed to The Keto Diet Podcast. Subscribe and listen on iTunes or your favorite podcast app.

 

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  1. I have been listening to your podcasts in reverse to catch up. This one resonated so much with me. I eat a lower carn ketogenic diet. and have since last October. Have had blood work done and the only abnormalty 3 months ago was my T3 conversion. I have done Beachbody programs the last 6 months. No weight loss and no muscle definition. It is so discouraging. The thought of stopping my workouts terrifies me because I already feel “doughy” all over. Not to mention it is my stress relief. However. I am so discouraged I am only 5′ 1 so the lbs I have put on the last year really show. Have no idea where to go from here. Having bloodwork redone next week to see if my T3 levels are up. Managing stress seems to be the fatal flaw in my life but cortisol levels are fine. Would just simple movement really help me release 10 lbs?

  2. I totally agree Leanne! I had to leave a comment to defend this podcast episode. I believe it is very important information to get out to women who just blame themselves for not working out hard enough. As you girls have lived through the experience it is a vicious cycle. I have to say as a 47 year old woman I totally see that exercise does not help my weight loss/maintance cycles. I am not overweight but really struggled because I had gut issues and candida residual from antibiotic use. For me not working out was very helpful in losing some lbs.i love your site and your podcast. Keep up the great work and i know you are helping many out here.This particular podcast subject may be the one that helps the most ladies who are dealing with adrenal fatique and hormone issues. Also anyone who listened to your whole podcast would know that you are not saying not to exercise or that it is dangerous. You just have to look at the whole picture because the body is so complex and as you ladies have stated. every body is different and that is why it this podcast is so essential to show that there is another side to exercise. You ladies rock. Keep these podcasts coming. I am a big fan!

    • Hey Ellie! Thanks for sharing your own experiences with exercise! You’re right -everybody is different and exercise may not look the same for all of us, depending on where we’re at with our health. Thanks for your support!

  3. Hi Leanne and Amber,

    We are two CSEP- Certified Exercise Physiologists with Bachelor’s of Science Kinesiology degrees and CSNN C.H.N. Holistic Nutritionists currently employed in Calgary. We have both followed you for a number of years and enjoy your recipes, however we find this post disappointing and concerning–mostly in regard to your opinions on exercise.

    After listening to this podcast, we have concluded that your message can be detrimental to women of the general population (and men although this was not your focus). Throughout this podcast both you and Amber have demonized exercise and used it as a scapegoat for hormonal imbalances and your personal health concerns. The message that we feel was lost was that it is not exercise alone that has created these health concerns it is a pattern of compulsive behavior and inability to cope with lifestyle stress. It would have been a fair message to use your personal experiences to encourage people to live a balanced life–which is what we all want for our society of excess.

    There are copious published research articles, textbooks and educational programs that support exercise in maintenance of good health–cardiovascular, resistance, flexibility and activities of daily living. I believe that you have a good following and you are doing yourself a disservice by pinning exercise as the culprit for health concerns to elicit shock value and potentially gain more followers. We as women need to educate our fellow sisters that healthy exercise programming that includes recovery and the above listed components–with a special note on resistance training for improved bone density, ease of childbirth, completion of daily tasks such as carrying your groceries, decreasing injury risk and SO MUCH MORE–are vital to longevity and improved quality of life physically and mentally.

    We agree that 80% of your health is nutrition related, however balanced, regular, and individualized exercise programming is also a key component to long term health. We encourage you to revise your message to not demonize exercise, switch your focus to obsessive behavior and lack of balance because ANYTHING in excess is not healthy for you.

    • Hi Carrie and Gillian! Thanks for reaching out to us and sharing your thoughts. Our intention with the episode was to share our experience and to portray, not that exercise made us unbalanced, but that by being unbalanced, intense exercise wasn’t assisting us in healing our bodies. It wasn’t until we stopped exercising in the traditional sense that we began to heal. As we mentioned in the podcast, we totally value people like you that work to make people’s lives better and more enriched by positive movement. Perhaps the title of the podcast was where you felt that we were demonizing exercise? I have listened to the episode a couple of times while editing and feel confident that the message we portrayed was finding positive, joyous movement, whatever that is for a person. For me (Leanne) it’s walking and stretching. For Amber, it’s hiking. And, we explained this in the podcast. I hope that by giving the episode another listen and perhaps ignoring the title of the episode you’ll see that this is what we were trying to communicate. As always, we value your opinion and thanks for following.

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