Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

I’ve often wondered what would happen if I replaced the oats in a classical oatmeal cookie with cooked quinoa. You know, for people that can’t have oats or want to liven up their cookie experience with a little high protein, quinoa action?

Last week, I received a big box of Bob’s Red Mill Grain of Discovery quinoa and sorghum in the mail. I took the package as a sign that the swapping of oats for cooked quinoa had to be done.

Originally, I toyed around with the idea of going out of a limb and making the cookies with whole grain sorghum. In the end, I went with quinoa because I knew it would be an ingredient that (most) of you could find easily. That, and sorghum takes upwards of 50 minutes to cook. Who has 50 minutes when they’re waiting for cookies? Not I. (But I did end up making a curry with the sorghum later… after I ate a mound of cookies.)

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

After a bit of testing and a couple of rounds of test batches, I successfully created an oat-free oatmeal cookie recipe for you. And? I made the cookies taste like carrot cake… because I could. And, and, and… they have way less sugar than your average cookie which makes them totally okay to have for breakfast.

Okay, quadruple and! I discovered the awesome power that is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-free All Purpose Baking Flour. I’m in love.

These babies are good to the very last spec of flax seed!

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

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4.1 from 7 reviews
Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies
Author: 
Recipe type: Vegan, Gluten-free, Dairy-free, Refined sugar-free, Yeast-free, Corn-free, Nut-free, Egg-free
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 24
 
Vegan, gluten-free carrot cake cookies made with cooked quinoa, maple syrup and raisins. All the goodness of carrot cake, with a breakfast feel.
Ingredients
Dry
Wet
Add-ins
  • ⅓ cup raisins
  • 1 cup shredded carrot, lightly packed, wrap in a clean kitchen towel and ring out extra juices
Optional Topping
Instructions
  1. Add quinoa and water to a saucepan. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and simmer for 15 minutes. Once complete, remove from the stove, remove lid and allow to cool for a couple of minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicon baking mat. Set aside.
  3. Add all dry ingredients to a large bowl. Then, measure 1½ cups of the cooked quinoa and add to the dry ingredients. Stir to coat, until all quinoa granules are covered in the mixture. Set aside.
  4. Add all wet ingredients to a small bowl and stir well.
  5. Pour into bowl with dry ingredients and stir to combine.
  6. Stir in raisins and shredded carrots.
  7. One tablespoon at a time, scoop mixture onto prepared baking sheet, leaving a small space between each cookie. They will not spread out, so you can keep the cookies close. Lightly form each cookie, as you'd like them to come out. I flattened them slightly between my palms.
  8. Bake in preheated oven for 25-30 minutes, until cooked through and golden.
  9. Remove from the oven, let cool on the pan for 10 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack and allowing them to cool for a couple of hours. Because cooked quinoa was used in this recipe, the longer you leave it to cool, the firmer it will become. Leave it be and it will transform!
  10. Drizzle with melted coconut butter and serve. These cookies can be stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

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Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

Add quinoa and water to a saucepan. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and simmer for 15 minutes. Once complete, remove from the stove, remove lid and allow to cool for a couple of minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicon baking mat. Set aside.

Add all dry ingredients to a large bowl. Then, measure 1 1/2 cups of the cooked quinoa and add to the dry ingredients. Stir to coat, until all quinoa granules are covered in the mixture. Set aside.

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

Add all wet ingredients to a small bowl and stir well.

Pour into bowl with dry ingredients and stir to combine.

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

Stir in raisins and shredded carrots.

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

One tablespoon at a time, scoop mixture onto prepared baking sheet, leaving a small space between each cookie. They will not spread out, so you can keep the cookies close. Lightly form each cookie, as you’d like them to come out. I flattened them slightly between my palms.

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

Bake in preheated oven for 25-30 minutes, until cooked through and golden.

Remove from the oven, let cool on the pan for 10 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack and allowing them to cool for a couple of hours. Because cooked quinoa was used in this recipe, the longer you leave it to cool, the firmer it will become. Leave it be and it will transform!

Drizzle with melted coconut butter and serve. These cookies can be stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

If you’re madly in love with all things Bob’s Red Mill, or you’ve never tried their products before, Bob’s Red Mill is offering up a $100 gift certificate to one Healthful Pursuit reader.

Enter this GLOBAL giveaway below…

$100 Bob’s Red Mill Giveaway
Thanks for entering, everyone! A random entry was selected and Tanya from Toronto has won! Congratulations, Tanya.

I want to hear your quinoa stories! What’s your favorite way to enjoy quinoa? Have you ever tried to make cookies with it? Tell me all about it in the comments below.

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Comments | Leave Your Comment

  1. These cookies are so yummy! I made a few adjustments based on ingredients I had. Instead of maple syrup, I used a simple syrup made from 1/2 turbinado sugar 1/2 water, I used slightly more carrots than called for, threw in a little nutmeg and I didn’t have raisins, so naturally I used semi sweet chocolate chips. It looked a little dry at the end so I used a couple tablespoons of coconut water and the result is fantastic! Thanks Leanne! I’m so excited to have stumbled upon your site!

    • wow, nice adjustments, Michelle! They’re one of my favorite breakfasts… ever. Although I think I say that about every recipe I make… I just love breakfast! Will have to add chocolate to carrot. I’ve never done that!

  2. This stuff makes the best cookie dough ever! Guilt and danger free!

    Weird fact– when you add allspice to this recipe (as I did) you discover that it tastes mildly like you didn’t rinse the quinoa properly. I suppose that’s why the cook left it out in the first place. *sheepish grin* Now, it still manages to be delicious, but… I guess we’ll have to see how the cookies bake out. They aren’t out of the oven yet. But oooh they smell AMAZING!

    One point of order– Do you measure the flax *before* you grind, or after? I tend to do it before– especially since it states “fresh ground”. But it does mean that if you happened to measure after, you might get different results. The volume differential is noticeable– especially for flax seed. That might explain another reader’s issue with dryness– though I admit, that wasn’t a problem for me. (As I measured the whole seed, THEN ground.) HOWEVER…

    I added a bit more liquid (maybe an extra tablespoon of syrup) because it looked like it was going to be dry. I mean, even my carrots were so dry that squeezing them only turned my tea towel orange. There was no liquid accumulating on the very bottom of the bundle. I could barely tell my tea towel was damp. Since the carrots felt more wet after the squeeze, I patted them dry and called it good enough.

    Also, if those are allergic to quinoa or otherwise have issue with it, you could try using cooked white buckwheat cereal, using 20% less liquid and cooking it like rice. It won’t be the same, but it will still have a pleasantly lumpy texture (albeit a bit softer than this), and the flavor will be excellent– if you make sure to use the polished grain, rather than whole grain. Don’t worry, it will still have plenty of fiber!

    As an added bonus, buckwheat is NOT a grain. It is a berry. No, I’m not making this up. It’s also even lower on the glycemic index than quinoa, and is grown in places like Poland, Germany and Argentina– and even in the United States.

    Also, pearled buckwheat does not have the bold and somewhat off putting flavor that it’s whole counterpart has. I am even told that whole untoasted buckwheat has a more neutral flavor, too. Since I haven’t seen a good price for the white in anything less than 5-25 pounds of the stuff, I haven’t tried it. YMMV. I think I’ll save that until I get my own food mill.

    Small pearl tapioca would also be an interesting experiment, but I have no idea what it would be like cooked like rice.

  3. I know this if off topic but I’m looking into starting my own blog and was curious what all is required to get setup?
    I’m assuming having a blog like yours would cost a pretty penny?

    I’m not very internet smart so I’m not 100% certain.
    Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Appreciate it

  4. I just made these. Very yummy. Had to substitute a few things because I didn’t have some ingredients or ran out half-way through. It is ridiculously cold out (4 degrees F in Georgia) and I had nothing else to do, but clean out the pantry & fridge :)
    Kept the cookies gluten free, but substituted spelt flour for all-purpose. Substituted 1/2 honey and 2 packets of stevia for molasses, and sub. 1/4 cup apple sauce for oil. The quinoa was already cooked since it was a leftover from last night’s dinner, and that worked out pretty well. I’m grateful to you for posting the recipe. Thank you so much!

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