Maple Turnip and Carrot Mash

My love for mashed potatoes goes deep.

The day I moved out of my parents house at the tender age of 17, I was very happy to learn that potatoes were about the only thing I could afford. That and egg noodles, tomato juice and licorice from Walmart.

Let’s just say there was a 3 year period in my life where I would polish off at least 4 potatoes a day. How I didn’t turn into a potato is beyond me.

So how does this lead us to carrots and turnips, exactly? Well, as much as I love potatoes, I’ve realized that having them everyday isn’t exactly ideal (and can actually cause sensitivities!).

When I’m hungry, tired and can’t think of anything to make; yes this happens to the best of us, I’ve always gravitated toward a big batch of mashed potatoes or yams and lived off it for a couple of days – along with some sort of protein of course.

But not this time, no, no. I’m ready for something lighter, sweeter and – gasp – potato free!

Maple Turnip and Carrot Mash

Vegan, Gluten free, Dairy free, Refined sugar free, Yeast free, Corn free, Grain free

A lighter and sweeter mashed vegetable dish, perfect for Thanksgiving… or any ‘ol day.

Yield: 6 cups

Servings: 6

Ingredients

  • 3 medium raw turnips, chopped
  • 4 cups carrots, chopped
  • 2 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoon extra virgin coconut oil

Directions

  1. Place chopped turnips and carrots in a large saucepan. Fill with water and bring to a boil with the lid on.
  2. Boil for 20 minutes, or until vegetables pierced with a fork are soft.
  3. Drain, return back to saucepan and add maple syrup and coconut oil.
  4. Serve with a protein .

calories: 104 | fat: 5g | carbohydrate: 16g | fiber: 3g | sugars: 10g | protein: 1.2g

Compared to the same portion of mashed potatoes made with 2% milk and butter:

calories: 354 | fat: 21g | carbohydrate: 37g | fiber: 3g | sugars: 4.6g | protein: 5.3g

Would you judge me if I said I actually kinda like these more than regular mashed potatoes? They’re lower in starch than the potato variety, which means I can combine them with meat with little impact to my digestion. Plus I can actually eat more because they’re not as filling…

Double bonus.

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