Leanne’s Canning Adventures: Pie Filling

by Leanne Vogel (Healthful Pursuit) on September 23, 2011

It’s been just over 2 weeks since I canned my first batch of pickles.

I’m happy to report that no jars have filled with mold AND my pickles are to die for. Guess that about makes it time for another canning adventure, huh?

Today it’s gluten-free, sugar reduced, pie filling.

I created 2 versions of pie filling:

  1. Peach
  2. Peach plum

Both are really tasty, but I think I liked peach plum a bit more. It has a bit of a tangy kick to it!

You can choose to make this quick and easy filling for a fresh pie, or try your hand at canning!

Equipment

  • Large saucepan (check out saucepan sets available from Procook)
  • Medium saucepan
  • Measuring cup
  • 3 (1L) mason jars with lids
  • 21 quart canner
  • Canning rack
  • Jar lifter
  • Funnel
  • Lid lifter
  • Bubble remover

 

Ingredients

Yield: Three 1 liter (0.26 gallon) jars of peach or peach plum pie filling

Peach

  • 1/2 cup quick tapioca
  • 6 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup palm sugar
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 12 cups sliced peaches – leave the skin on!
  • 1 cup water

Peach Plum

  • 1/2 cup quick tapioca
  • 6 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup palm sugar
  • 2 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 8 cups sliced peaches – leave the skin on!
  • 4 cups sliced plums – leave the skin on!
  • 1 cup water

Directions

Prepare jars + lids

  1. Place mason jars in the dishwasher and run using the sanitize setting.
  2. Fill the canning pot with hot water, cover and bring the water to a boil on high heat.
  3. Once boiled, remove lid, place canning rack at the bottom of the pot. Gently place each mason jar in the water, filling the jar up with the water as it hits the bottom of the pot. Use jar lifter (tongs) to set the jars upright.
  4. Once all jars are in the pot, reduce heat to medium low and simmer covered for 30-60 minutes, or until you’re ready to use the jars
  5. In a small saucepan, fill with water and bring to a simmer. Add the lid disks, cover the saucepan, and take it off the heat.
  6. After the jars have been in the canning pot for over 30 minutes, use the jar lifter (tongs) to lift a jar out of the simmering water. Pour the hot water back into the pot and place the jar on a towel on the counter.

Make the filling (the most important part!)

  1. No matter which recipe you’re working from: combine the first 4 ingredients in a small bowl. Stir to combine and set aside.
  2. Place sliced peaches, or the combination of peaches and plums, in a large saucepan. Pour water over top, cover with a lid, and bring to a simmer.
  3. Once the water is simmering, add the tapioca mixture. Stir gently to mix and continue to simmer mixture on low heat for an additional 2-3 minutes.
  4. Remove from heat, keep covered, and set aside.

Filling the jars

  1. Place the canning funnel over the jar and using a ladle, begin filling each jar with pie filling, leaving 1/2″ headspace.
  2. Wipe the rim with a clean cloth or paper towel.
  3. Using the lid lifter (magnet poker) to remove a lid disk from the saucepan of hot water, dry with clean towel and place it on the jar. Screw on a band until it’s hand-tight. Not too tight, juuuust right.
  4. Repeat with the remaining jars and ingredients.

Making the jars POP

  1. Meanwhile, get the canning water back up to a boil.
  2. Place the jars in the canning rack before submerging into the canner.
  3. Ensure that all jars are covered by at least 1″ of water. Cover, and return to a boil if the water isn’t there already.
  4. Process for 10 minutes (add 1 minute for every 1000 ft. over sea level = 13.5 minutes for Calgary) Start timing after the water has reached boiling.
  5. Turn off heat and remove the lid from the canning pot. Let the jars stand in the hot water for 5 minutes.
  6. Use the jar lifter (tongs) to transfer the jars to a clean towel on the counter. Be sure not to shake the jar, tip it over, tighten the bands, or do anything to disrupt them.
  7. Let them stand for 24 hours. Any jars that do not seal should be refrigerated.

Once the jars are cooled, label them with the name of the recipe and the date they were made.

I cannot wait to rip into these in the dead of winter when apples and potatoes will fill my long, dark, and cold days.

That is… if I can wait that long.

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{ 19 comments… read them below or add one }

chelsey @ clean eating chelsey

I wish I got into canning this year! I am definitely going to try my hand at it next year!

Reply

Averie @ Love Veggies and Yoga

My mom and grandma canned or pickled everything!

From watermelon rind pickles <—nothing was wasted, not even rinds! and they are awesome, just trust me

To peach jam, apple jelly, etc…they preserved summer in jars so come winter, we still had summer with us :)

Your pie filling looks amazing.

I dont can b/c I am scared of all that boiling water and jars/sealing etc…too much can go wrong! But I do make freezer jam.

Reply

Kaitlyn@TheTieDyeFiles

Looks delicious. I definitely need to freeze/can for the winter to beat some seasonal blues. I’ve seen it on so many blogs now, it’s calling my name!

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Kristi Rimkus

My aunt used to can all kinds of fruits and vegetables. She loved it, but it’s definitely a lot of work! I love that you’ve made these recipes gluten free. My daughter-in-law has gluten sensitivities, so I’m always on the lookout for recipes that work for her too. Have a good weekend!

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Kristin @ eat healthy. be happy. live well.

I wish I would have done this with some of the peaches I got. I ended up freezing them and using in smoothies and oatmeal. Next year, I will definitely try my hand at canning! Thanks for such a detailed overview of the process!!!

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Sam

Cool! That is so neat. I wish I lived in a house and not a teeny apartment so I could can tons of stuff and have space for it!

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Holly @ The Runny Egg

I really want to start canning, but I just don’t take the time to do it! Seriously I want to open up that jar and just eat the pie filling with a spoon — it looks incredible!

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Evan Thomas

I love tapioca starch. It’s one of my new favorite finds. Haven’t tried making pie with it yet, though. Definitely on the list of things to make!

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Leanne (Healthful Pursuit)

Same here. It works so perfectly in pie!

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Katie

Did your filling split with the tapioca? I used cornstarch last year and my fillings all split a few days later. I heard that tapioca did the same thing. Any tips?

Reply

Leanne (Healthful Pursuit)

That’s weird. It’s been about 2.5 weeks since I made the filling and I checked on the jars last night, just to be sure. Nothing split. It all looked perfect. I allowed the tapioca to soak in the lemon juice for 5-10 minutes before I added it to the boiled peach mixture. Then I just cooked it about 2 minutes until it turned gel-like. I hope that helps!

Reply

Lindsay

Yum! I haven’t made any pie fillings with my canning adventures in the past (lol, I only started last year), but this year I’ve already made dill pickles, pickled carrots, white peaches in a light vanilla syrup, blueberry jam and bumbleberry jam (mix of strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, blueberry and saskatoon). I have some bread and butter pickles to make and some salsa, and we’ll see after that!

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Leanne (Healthful Pursuit)

Wow, you’re on canning FIRE! Sounds like you have a great collection :)

Reply

michelle

I really want to try this but I’ve never used tapioca before. Is it for thickening or does it give more of a gel texture?

Reply

Leanne (Healthful Pursuit)

It can be used for thickening when in powdered form, similar to corn starch. If it’s in quick cooking form (like the Club House package I added to the post) it’s more of a gel texture, like you’d see in regular pie filling. I’m LOVING tapioca right now!

Reply

Tess

Thank you for the low sugar recipe. We just pulled them out of the canner and they are cooling now.

Just an FYI from someone who isn’t very good at math. I ended up with 3 pint and a half jars with left over syrup (which we plan to put on french toast tomorrow ; )

So for anyone doing the math, that is how many jars I came up for each individual batch. I did two of them today. The jars are popping now!

Thanks again and feel free to correct my math.

Reply

Jeanne

Hi,
My husband has celiac and cannot tolerate gluten. I was wondering if you have ever tried using the tapioca for making apple pie filling. He loves apple pies and I wanted to can some but keep seeing everyone say don’t use it when I ran across you website.

Sincerely,
Jeanne

Reply

Joann

This recipe sounds good and with food allergies, it’s right up my alley.

How could you adapt this recipe to make apple pie filling?

Thanks

Reply

Leanne Vogel (Healthful Pursuit)

I would just replace it with apples, easy peasy! Maybe add a bit of cinnamon ;)

Reply

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